Monthly Archives: May 2018

Your Nines Are A Lie

Is your service three nines, four nines, or even five? No matter what your answer is, it’s almost surely inaccurate.

I recently went through an exercise at work to calculate the expected availability of one of our foundational systems. It reminded me how little these calculations have to do with actual availability as experienced by consumers. Expected availability numbers are generally based on hardware failure rates. You take how often it fails with how long it takes to repair, and that gives you the component availability. An individual server may have an expected availability number of 99% which means in an average year you’d expect it to be down for repairs for about three and a half days. An easy way to raise the availability of a system is to have redundant components – if you have two of those servers, your system availability goes up to 99.99%. Why? Because the chances of both servers failing at the same time are really small. With three servers you get up to 99.9999%. As you make this system more complex with more layers and more dependencies, the math gets a little more complicated but the idea stays the same, and so you can calculate an expected availability of your entire system based on the availability of each of its components. If you’re running a production system at scale a typical design (redundant data centers, redundant circuits, redundant systems) could easily reach 99.999% (five nines) on paper. That’s about 5 minutes of downtime per year. For calibration, it would take 12 years of uninterrupted service to be able to take a 1 hour outage and still be at five nines. But every big outfit, including Google, AWS, and Facebook has experienced outages longer than that, even though they have big budgets and super smart people designing their systems. Why?

It turns out that most big outages are not caused by component failures. The most common cause of a major outage is someone making a change. All three of the outages I linked to above were caused by a human making a change. Reliability calculations based on component failures tell you absolutely zero about how likely your system is to fail when you make changes – that depends on the quality of your tooling, the frequency of your changes, the design of your system, and the capabilities and training of your team. The second most common cause of outages is overloads – where your system (or some critical subsystem) can’t keep up with what’s being sent at it. Two of the three examples involved overload conditions.

I’ve seen a lot of outages in my career and a vanishingly small percentage were caused by hardware failures – pretty much any decent system these days has been designed to handle individual component failures. The trick is figuring out how to make your system resilient in the face of change and making sure you have the tooling you need to be able to react to and quickly fix any problems that do come up (including being able to quickly add new capacity if needed). If you’re trying to build a reliable service you should pay just as much attention to those as you do to the reliability of your system components!